Posts Tagged ‘bass’

Savage Gear 2012

Monday, February 27th, 2012

The Future Is Savage, at least when it comes to supreme lure actions. For those unfamiliar with the brand, Savage Gear is the brainchild of Mads Grosell, a detail-oriented engineer 100% consumed by fish and fishing. With paper and pencil, Grosell has scribed, then constructed the ultimate baitfish actions in Savage Gear hard and soft 4PLay lures.  For pike, musky, halibut, bass and a host of inshore species, Grosell plays with predatory instinct with the full control of a puppet master.

The Savage 4Play is a complete line of hard and soft baits with extensive available sizes and diving characteristics.

Developed and retailed in Europe, Okuma Fishing Tackle has brought Savage Gear to the United States.  Our selection is concise, focusing on the most unique and productive of the selection, but be assured, there’s more to come.

For now, enjoy the 4Play lineup in all its custom configurations, the Larvae, Cutbait Herring and incredibly versatile Sandeels.

Check out the Savage Gear 2012 USA catalog here:  Savage Gear USA 2012 Catalog

See the footage of Savage Gear 4Play lure actions here:  Savage 4Play Video

Mark Romanack’s Fishing 411 Now National

Monday, March 7th, 2011

The Midwest is a sportsman’s paradise.

Mark Romanack with Largemouth Bass

Fishing 411 host Mark Romanack with a largemouth bass.

Through all four seasons of the year, anglers in the Upper Midwest  have the ability to chase a wide variety of game fish from small farm ponds to the big water of the Great Lakes.  For years now, we’ve sponsored Mark Romanack’s Fishing 411 television with the goal of increasing angler success and enjoyment within the local markets of the Upper Midwest.

As it happens when you have a host that cares about the viewers and delivering information that will positively impact their fishing, Mark Romanack’s Fishing 411 has gone national!  The show is now available on the Sportsman Channel at 8:30pm Saturday nights as part of the network’s Strike & Set Saturdays.  We’re excited for Mark and very happy to have another avenue for customers of Okuma Fishing Tackle to connect with the fisheries we all enjoy so much.

Fishing 411 centers on the bread basket fisheries of the Upper Midwest:  walleye, panfish, bass, trout, salmon, pike and musky.  The show provides the perfect platform to showcase the broad breadth of the Okuma product line from Trio spinning reels, to linecounters, to Citrix rods and reels and the technique-specific EVx rods.

Romanack’s format is educational, delivering not only the “where,” but the “how,” interspersed with helpful tips that will serve anglers well as they pursue similar opportunities in the fisheries local to them.

Marck Romanack with Great Lakes Salmon

Viewers of Fishing 411 will enjoy a wide range of the Upper Midwest's best fishing opportunities.

For news on upcoming shows, or to view past episodes, visit the Fishing 411 website at http://www.fishing411.net.

What Is Dual Force Drag?

Monday, March 7th, 2011

Spinning reels are being reborn.  From delicate drop shot presentations for bass, to float fishing for river steelhead, to speed jigging powerful offshore species… the spinning reel is climbing to new heights of performance and popularity.

Easy to own and simple to operate, the single weakness in all spinning reel designs is the fact that the line must make a 90-degree transition coming off of the spool and going around the line roller before heading to the first rod guide. Where conventional reels efficiently pull straight from the spool, this 90-degree angle on a spinning reel  introduces a pressure point on line that’s capable of taking knots and weak spots past their breaking point if not backed by a super smooth drag system.

Exploded image of Trio spool and Dual Force Drag system

Components of Dual Force Drag include the traditional top drag stack as well as the oversized drag washer located beneath the spool.

Enter Dual Force Drag, with far-reaching benefits that turn spinning reels into precision big fish and light line performers. First the easy part:  Dual Force Drag is an Okuma drag system that utilizes the spacious underside of the spinning reel spool to provide a large secondary drag surface that operates in concert with the traditional top drag stack.  Moving into direct benefits, Dual Force Drag delivers better heat dissipation, greater longevity, even pressure on the reel spool and higher available drag ranges.

Heat, in any drag system, is the enemy.  Heat swells internal reel parts, and when it comes to drag systems, heat creates wildly fluctuating pressures and deteriorates components.  By dramatically increasing the surface area of the drag system, Dual Force Drag dissipates heats much better than a traditional top stack.  Lack of heat means start-up pressures remain smooth and even, as do pressures when big fast fish make smoking hot runs.

When under the pressure of running fish, Dual Force Drag offers greater balance.  If you’ve ever used the brakes on a car where one side is worn, the remaining side pulls very hard when braking pressure is applied.  Same on a reel.  As drag pressure ramps up, a traditional top stack brakes only from the top of the spool.  The internal components receive the wrath of the one-sided load and are forced to carry the strain.  With Dual Force Drag, top and bottom of the spool receive the load evenly, and like your car, brake with even pressure that protects the alignment of all the other components.

Wahoo taken on a Cedros spinning reel.

Wahoo are known as some of the fastest fish in the ocean. Cedros spinning reels proved the right choice for Into the Blue hosts Scott Walker and Steve Roger.

And here’s the kicker: since Dual Force Drag delivers a massive increase in surface area, maximum drag outputs increase big time too.  Our 40-size spinning reels with standard top stack drag systems will output 13-pounds of maximum drag pressure.  The same 40-size spinning reel with Dual Force Drag, including Trio, Cedros, VSystem and Coronado series, will output 20-pounds of drag… an increase of more than 50%.  Even if you do not currently push your drag system to its’ limit, there’s good reason to enjoy the increase.  Most importantly is wear.  By operating in the low to mid-range of the drag’s capacity, the washers will last longer, heat disappears as an issue and buttery-smooth is operational norm.  And in the age of braided lines, should you want to put that 40-size through its’ paces, by all means, buckle down and drop the hammer.

As mentioned, Dual Force Drag is a feature on Trio, Cedros, VSystem and Coronado series spinning reels.  It’s also a feature on Makaira and Cedros lever drag offshore reels, but that as they say, is another story!

In all cases, the best thing you can do to extend the life of all your spinning reel drag systems, regardless of type, is to back the pressure off them completely after each use.  Finish the day, back off the drag.  Make it a habit and all your drag systems will operate better over the long term.

The Love of the Game. Winter Tactics by Joel St. Germain

Monday, January 17th, 2011

Ever wonder what a tournament angler with over 50 career wins thinks about when not under the pressure of competitive fishing? For Okuma Pro-Staff member Joel St. Germain, it’s still fishing. Always looking to learn and to glean new information for sure, his approach shifts and focus widens, taking in many more of the simple pleasures fishing offers. We loved this article and wanted to pass it on. To judge a day simply by numbers of fish is to miss out on much of the available experience. Please enjoy!

Everyone says they love to go fishing, right? For most of us, there’s not much we’d rather do than launch boat and spend a day or part of a day with our friends, chunkin’ and windin’.

But there’s another breed, another level, of fisherman. These are the folks who go fishing whenever they can, and I mean whenever. The only reason these people look at the weather report is to just make sure it’s physically possible to launch the boat. Wind, rain, cold, ice – these are just variables, not obstacles to going fishing.

Joel St. Germain with winter bass

There's a solitude and peace to winter bass fishing. And the rewards ain't to bad either!

I can tell you, I have had some of my best days fishing in the winter. Being from New England, we’re used to bad weather. In New England, the winters are bone-chilling cold. By late November, most of the days are in the 20’s overnight, with daytime highs in the 40’s. We get a lot of wind, and the wind chill factor brings it down to the teens some days.

As a result, around here, tournaments end in late October. After that, the weather is just too unpredictable. On the other hand, for me I’m just settling into my next season and keeping my Okuma gear in my hands! I’m a firm believer the time I spend on the water in the winter will really help me hone my skills. Plus, it’s a lot of fun.

My favorite style of fishing is for deep smallmouth that pile up on humps and points in 30 feet of water. When we do this, I throw a drop shot or spoon. Both work, and both will catch fish after fish even when the water is in the low 40’s.

Many people ask….How do you catch them when the air is in the 20’s and 30’s and the water is around 42 or 44 degrees? I’m a firm believer… the key is finding the bait. You have to find the schools of white or yellow perch. The fish won’t be too far away. The water down at 30 feet is cold, probably even colder than the surface, but it’s always cold down there. Even in the summer, the water down there is in the mid-60’s, so for the fish, it’s not a huge change.

You have to fish slowly too. I spent many hours over the years working on mastering the art of spoon jigging, working it in small, tiny hops. Most guys yank on it like they’re jigging Cod. You have to just move it in tiny twitches, letting it flutter down. The fish usually grab it on the drop. Sharp hooks are a key too. You need to have the best hooks you can for this kind of fishing.

When fishing with a close friend “Jim”, we always have our rituals – we tell stories of the year past, talk about what trails we’re going to be fishing in the upcoming year, and exchange holiday greetings to pass on to each others families.

This past year I’ve had some fun memories fishing with Jim. For me, last year I caught my biggest smallmouth ever on December 20th and on the same day caught almost 50 fish in a half day, literally one after the other. At times, we had doubles and triples. Some were small, some were big, and some were just yellow perch. But it was fishing, and laughing, and a break from work, family, and responsibilities.

We learn a lot doing this, but there’s more to it than just putting in “time on the water.” For me, I just enjoy the fishing, with no pressure to find fish for a tournament, or put together a pattern. All too soon another tournament year will begin and I’ll be fishing my way back to the Bassmasters classic, looking for one more bite to seal a solid finish.

But for now, I’m just fishing… this is the way I like to think of it…..

“We are one day closer to spring!”

Peace
Joel